I HATE weaving in ends. Any tips to make this terrible necessity easier?

Weaving in ends is the least popular part of our craft. It is a tedious but necessary job – not unlike cleaning up the kitchen after Thanksgiving dinner. Here are some tips to make the dreaded task a bit easier to bear.

Use the right tools

Weaving in ends does not require complicated tools. All you really

Weaving in ends is the least popular part of our craft. It is a tedious but necessary job – not unlike cleaning up the kitchen after Thanksgiving dinner. Here are some tips to make the dreaded task a bit easier to bear.

Use the right tools

Weaving in ends does not require complicated tools. All you really need is a tapestry needle and a pair of sharp scissors. Tapestry needles come in a variety of sizes and styles. My favorite type is bent the tip needle which almost seems to find its own way into the desired stitches, making things go faster. Yet when it comes to weaving in ends, the most important tool in your arsenal is time. Don’t rush the process or you’ll be disappointed with the results.

Make it easy on yourself

New knitters may aim for short tails in the interest of saving yarn, but this is a mistake. Experienced knitters leave generous tails, at least 4-5 inches or even longer. Short yarn tails are difficult to weave while keeping the needle threaded. However, if short ends are unavoidable, a crochet hook is a handy tool for maneuvering tiny tails into place. Seams are also a great place to hide your weaving. To keep the tails at the seams, change yarn balls only at the end of rows as you knit.

Divide and conquer bulky yarn

It can be difficult to weave in bulky yarn because of its thickness. Try gently pulling the strands apart and weaving them in separately. If the bulky yarn you’ve chosen cannot be pulled apart, make the final cuts on an angle to taper the ends. Be sure to weave on wrong side and continually check on the right side to guarantee the ends are completely hidden.

Don’t let it slip away

Weaving in ends with silk, bamboo, or mercerized cotton yarns can be tricky because these materials lack the grabby fibers of wool and acrylic. Some suggest weaving in as you go, but you could be faced with ends that pop out after blocking. So block your finished project before tackling the ends. If all else fails, tack down slippery ends with a needle and invisible thread.

Finally, find a way to make the process fun. I know more than one knitter who has a multitude of nearly finished projects in want of woven-in ends. Why not invite friends for a Sunday afternoon of coffee and yarn tails. Or indulge yourself by binge-watching your favorite shows while getting the job done.

Comments
  • Signe Kline

    Short tails can be woven in by first working the unthreaded needle in and out as you want the tail to go, THEN thread the needle and pull it thru.

    Reply

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