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Skill Level: Easy


Poplar Cardi

As cozy as a giant hug, this oversized cardigan with balloon sleeves is constructed so there is only one seam! Worked from cuff to center back in two pieces, this project is a breeze to knit and perfect for throwing on when the temperature drops.

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Northwoods Twisted Cowl

Quick knits are a warm welcome for relaxing days at the cabin. Bands of stockinette and reverse stockinette stitches add thickness and make this cowl reversible. The cowl is knit just to fit over the head and keep the neck and shoulders warm.

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Bonfire Plaid Blanket

Don’t be intimidated by a bold, plaid pattern! This Bonfire Plaid Blanket is surprisingly simple to create. Using an easy rectangular shape, watch as slip stitches and horizontal garter stripes come together to create a delightful plaid pattern right before your eyes.

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Reversible Waves Scarf

This reversible scarf features two visually stimulating wavy patterns that complement each other no matter which way the scarf is worn. Using eyelets and strategically placed knits and purls, this scarf swirls effortlessly around your neck.

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Leaf Lines Sweater

Leaf Lines is a close fitting, elegant sweater with added waist shaping for a flattering silhouette. The panels of diamond leaves down each sleeve add an extra feminine touch to this cozy fall sweater.

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Wickerwork Set

Wickerwork is a seamless, unisex pullover worked in round from the top down, beginning with a ribbed neckline. The front and the back have pretty wicker-like pattern and the sleeves are worked plain. The hat is worked from the bottom up beginning with a ribbed brim. The hat is topped with a large pom-pom.

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Burnt Sienna Slouch Hat

The Burnt Sienna Slouch Hat is an easy-to-knit hat that features a wide double-ribbed band and a geometric design that wraps around the front two-thirds of the hat. Worked up in a gorgeous copper color, this hat is the perfect autumn accessory.

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Stoughton Coffee Bean Scarf

What we today call the coffee break originated in Stoughton, WI in the late 19th century with the wives of Norwegian immigrants. The stripes (or color breaks) of this scarf represent the breaks from work normally associated with the term coffee break.  And the unevenness of the stripes represents the difference in the way coffee breaks are taken from company to company and office to office. Unroasted coffee beans are green in color, which was the inspiration for the yarn chosen for some of the stripes. Who knew knitting could teach us so many fun facts?

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