How does someone work with super bulky yarn with lots of clumps/lumps throughout?

Hi Mallory,

There are many yarns that contain a variety of textures all in the same skein. Rowan Thick ‘n’ Thin, Patons Cobbles and handspuns from indie yarn makers like Happy Fuzzy Yarns all contain mix of weights and textures. You might think working with these kinds of yarns would be a challenge, but it is

Hi Mallory,

There are many yarns that contain a variety of textures all in the same skein. Rowan Thick ‘n’ Thin, Patons Cobbles and handspuns from indie yarn makers like Happy Fuzzy Yarns all contain mix of weights and textures. You might think working with these kinds of yarns would be a challenge, but it is in fact surprisingly easy! Here are a few tips for making your project a success:

Choose the right needle size: Select a needle size that coincides with the thickest part of the yarn, not the thinnest. Start by swatching with the needle size recommended by the manufacturer, then go up or down as desired. The finished fabric should appear fairly even in gauge with the exception of periodic clusters of texture.

Keep it simple: Highly textured fibers like these thick/thin bulky yarns don’t need fancy lace or cable stitches to make them look good. Any stitch pattern will likely be lost in all the rich texture these yarns create, so you would be doing a lot of extra work with very little pay off. For best results, stick to garter or stockinette stitch and let the yarn do all the work for you. Another advantage to all that texture is that it will hide your mistakes.

A little goes a long way: Many knitters find it a bit overwhelming to knit an entire garment or blanket with such highly textured yarn. Instead, try working it in as an accent. Use your favorite thick/thin yarn to knit an eye-catching border on an afghan or a set of dramatic cuffs on a sweater. These highly textured fibers can also make interesting jewelry items. You could make a quick necklace and cuff bracelet to add a pop or color and texture to any plain outfit.

So don’t be intimidated by bulky multi-textured yarns – working with them isn’t as tricky as you thought. Employ them strategically to add visual interest to any plain-jane project, and you’ll get big bang for your knitting buck.

 

 AngeliaRobinson

Angelia Robinson is a knit and crochet designer residing in Los Angeles whose playful yet elegant designs explore the interplay of shape, texture, and style. Do you have a knitting question for Angelia? Write us (submissions@ilikeknitting.com) and include “Ask a Knitter” in the subject line.

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